The Soul Food Pod Episode 13: Black History Month Food

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The episode partial transcript and audio description are below for Black History Month Food.

Black History Month Food episode partial transcript:

Today, we’re talking about Black History Month food.

AND… Golden State Warriors star Draymond Green who calls for us to:

“Get rid of Black History Month!”

The Soul Food Pod - Black History Month Soul Food

Where to listen to The Soul Food Pod

Apple Podcasts: Black History Month Food

Spotify: Black History Month Food

The Soul Food Pod Episode - Black History Month Soul Food

What you’ll learn in this episode?

  • Shaunda and her son Dahvi dive into a thought-provoking discussion about the representation of Black history and culture in today’s society.
  • Explore the experiences of different generations, acknowledging the risk of being overwhelmed by the multitude of voices in today’s media landscape.
  • Dahvi explains how the tragic murder of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor during the COVID crisis became a turning point, prompting a vital need to address critical racial issues and make an impact.
  • Throughout this compelling episode, The Soul Food Pod serves up a delectable feast of food, history, and meaningful conversations, including what Draymond Green said about BHM.
  • Wrapping up the episode, Shaunda expresses her gratitude to her sons for joining her and encourages you to explore soul food and take your recipes beyond Southern!

Beautiful Souls!

Let’s start off our conversation today about Black History Month food with one of the most frequently asked questions about soul food…

What’s the difference between Southern food and soul food?

Many people associate soul food with Southern comfort food and the South. 

But soul food goes way beyond Southern cooking and often gets lost in translation and grouped in with Southern food.

While most soul food is Southern. 

Not all Southern food is soul food. 

That’s why it’s important to distinguish when a recipe or dish is Black folks’ food – made the African-American way.

What is soul food, and where did it come from?

Soul food is African American food derived from Black enslaved people’s take from often unwanted or unknown parts, scraps, or leftovers of American and British cuisine. 

Combined with the soulful essence of West Africa for color, warmth, and flavor, it’s the preservation of Black people’s food traditions.

So, let’s talk a bit more about African American food culture

Why is food so important to Black culture?

Soul foods are an African American culture of hearty homecooked meals that you can point out by dishes with plenty of seasoning and rich flavor! 

Black people have a culture that goes deeper than our African roots. And the food we eat reflects our rich culture. 

Black music, the way we talk, what we eat, and the way we talk about the things we love are all entwined in our food. 

So often referred to as swag and flavor.

Food is vital in Black culture because it brings people around the table and puts a pause on the constant oppression of our people, along with fast-paced living. 

Replacing it with good times, comfort food, happiness, and laughs. 

Black people gather, connect, and celebrate with soul food. Food is a way to show how much another person is cared for. 

Being able to feed someone is a significant and respected part of Black food culture

So what makes soul food soul food?

Asked another way, what makes a dish authentic soul food?

Simply put, ‘Soul’ is the word used to describe the swag and unique style of African-American cuisine. You know. The flavor. 

The Soul Food Podcast Ep. 13 - Black History Month Soul Food

And now the question, what is Black folks’ food?

Chicken, especially fried chicken, is a food thrown on the doorsteps of Black people as a way to identify us. 

But, of course, you know, African Americans didn’t invent the chicken, LOL! We just perfected seasoning it!

There’s no denying that chicken with a balance of seasoned tender meat on the inside and flavorful skin on the outside is a soul food specialty. 

A legacy of making it this way. Recipes handed down from generation to generation. 

That’s Black folks’ food.

Black folks’ food is a legacy of how African-Americans make soul food and a category of recipes on TheSoulFoodPot.com

People have asked me, “Why do you call it Black folks’ food?”

Because these are Black folks’ recipes. And I’m so proud to share them!

I’m deliberate and intentional about giving credit to our community of talented chefs, cooks, and creators. 

No more apologizing or hiding our Blackness and its beauty.

My mission is to remain standing on the right side of history. 

I’m consciously doing my part to honor the ancestors as one of the gatekeepers protecting the legacies of African-American culture.

With my hand on the sacred urn of tradition, vowing to protect and preserve Black culture and generations of blessed soul food recipes.

And the fun part of all of this?

Every time you make and share Black folks’ food. You stand with the ancestors, too!

As Toni Tipton-Martin says in the Netflix series High On The Hog, 

“I am using my platform to draw attention to Black excellence.” 

Thanksgiving Turkey Dinner

So what is Black History Month?

Black History Month is an annual observance originating in the United States, also known as African-American History Month. 

Black History Month is acknowledged during February, receiving official recognition from governments in the United States, Canada, and, more recently, Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Black History Month aims to honor the contributions that African Americans have made and to recognize their sacrifices.

Now, back to Draymond Green and what he had to say about Black History Month:

“At some point, can we get rid of Black History Month? Why do we get the shortest month to celebrate our history?” 

He finished with:

“Teach my history from January 1 to December 31, and then do it again, and then again, and then again, and then again.” – Draymond Green

Making it clear that his issue is NOT the celebration of Black history.

Full disclosure: My immediate family and I are Golden State Warriors fans (Go Dubs!)! 

But that has nothing to do with why I couldn’t agree more with Draymond Green’s sentiments about Black History Month!

And speaking of family, I lead my life with this constant question:

“What kind of ancestor will I be?”

So in honor of Black History, I’ve asked our youngest son and firstborn grandson to be my extraordinary guests today to talk about what Black history means to them and in the eyes of their generation.

Introducing my son, Dahvi, and my grandson, Kobe!

🎙 Listen to the episode to hear Dahvi and Kobe’s conversation – The Soul Food Pod: Black History Month Food

So what do you eat in Black History Month?

While there’s no official list, you can enjoy notable recipes like collard greens, candied yams, homemade cornbread, baked macaroni and cheese, chicken and dressing, sweet potato pie, and banana pudding – to name a few soul food menu favorites. 

These recipes are part of the authentic soul food family. Recipes passed along through generations and a legacy of African Americans. Black folks’ food!

Black Folks Soul Food-Southern Fried Chicken
Black Folks Soul Food Southern Fried Chicken Recipe
What is the secret to good fried chicken?
The answer is a soul food Southern fried chicken recipe that Black folks created and perfected!
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Southern Baked Mac And Cheese
Black Folks Soul Food Baked Macaroni And Cheese
Soul food baked mac and cheese is made with a rich & creamy homemade cheese sauce & yummy Southern spices. Southern comfort food the Black folks way!
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Soul Food Collard Greens Recipe
Black Folks Soul Food Collard Greens Recipe
What is a soul food collard greens recipe?
A Black folks collard greens recipe is the quintessential dish of any Southern soul food dinner.
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Southern Candied Yams
Southern Candied Yams The Soul Food Way
Candied yams are an old-fashioned Southern African-American recipe. A sweet potato soul food side dish cooked to perfection in a cinnamon-brown sugar glaze.
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Potato Salad Recipe
Black Folks Southern Potato Salad Recipe
Black folks Southern potato salad recipe is a must-have for any African American cookout, family reunion, picnic, or potluck! It’s a creamy yet tangy dressing balanced by soul food seasonings and flavors. AKA Black cookout potato salad! 
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Cornbread Dressing Recipe
Black Folks Cornbread Dressing Recipe
Black folks cornbread dressing recipe is a Southern dish you shouldn’t miss on the soul food Thanksgiving menu. It's easy for anyone to make!
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Southern Homemade Cornbread
Black Folks Southern Homemade Cornbread
Black folks homemade cornbread does not use a box mix. Instead, cornmeal is used to make this Southern skillet cornbread recipe from scratch.
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Sweet Potato Pie Recipe
Black Folks Sweet Potato Pie Recipe
A Black folks’ sweet potato pie recipe is a delightful Thanksgiving and Christmas dessert packed with flavorful seasonings and spices in the tradition of Black folks’ soul food cooking. 
Check out this recipe!
Black Southern Banana Pudding
Black Folks Southern Banana Pudding
How to make banana pudding the Black way
You'll never be able to look at other banana pudding the same way once you've tried this soul food delicious delight – Southern banana pudding prepared the Black way!
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe
Black Folks Southern Peach Cobbler Recipe
This soul food dessert and the darling favorite of the South is loaded with fresh, juicy peaches and topped with a light and airy cinnamon sugar crust. A cobbler so delicious, you may want to eat it all. All by yourself!
Check out this recipe!
Black Folks Southern Sweet Tea
Black Folks Southern Sweet Tea
Southern sweet tea is a delicious blend of refreshingly sweet and tangy flavors. (Mostly sweet flavors when it comes to making Black folks Southern sweet tea!)
But sweet ice tea is more than just a thirst-quenching beverage – it's a symbol of Southern hospitality and good company, and it's enjoyed throughout the deep South all year.
"All that sweet tea and cobbler!"
Check out this recipe!

Thank you, sons, my Black Kings, for being here with us on The Soul Food Pod today!

Transcript Ep. 13:

The Soul Food Pod – Episode 13 Transcript

The Soul Food Pod episodes’ show notes

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The Soul Food Pod Episode 13 - Black History Month Soul Food
Black Folks Soul Food Collard Greens Recipe

Black History Month Food | Black Folks Soul Food Collard Greens

What is a soul food collard greens recipe?
It's Black History Month food at its finest. A recipe handed down from generation to generation in the Black community and a quintessential dish of any Southern soul food dinner!
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Pressure Release Time: 15 minutes
Total Time: 45 minutes
Course: Salad, Side Dish
Cuisine: Southern Food, Vegan Soul Food
Servings: 8
Calories: 240kcal

Equipment

  • Instant Pot electric pressure cooker

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds collard greens 3 bundles
  • 1 turkey leg pre-cooked/smoked (this ingredient is optional)
  • 1 cup yellow onion diced
  • 2 cups tomatoes diced
  • 4 cups chicken stock use vegetable stock to make vegan and vegetarian-friendly
  • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 tablespoon hot sauce or sriracha sauce
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • ½ teaspoon Old Bay seasoning or Cajun or Creole seasoning
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

  • Clean the collard greens and cut off the stems.
    Clean the collard greens and cut off the stems.
  • Then roughly chop the leaves in half through the midline and then into bite-sized pieces.
    Chop the leaves in half through the midline and then into bite-sized pieces.
  • Open the Instant Pot lid and add the wet ingredients (chicken stock, vinegar, Worcestershire sauce, honey, and hot sauce to the stainless-steel inner pot.
  • Next, add the onion, tomatoes, garlic, Old Bay or Cajun seasoning, red pepper flakes, salt, pepper, and stir to combine the ingredients.
  • Finally, add the collard greens, followed by the cooked turkey leg.
    Finally, add the collard greens, followed by the cooked turkey leg.
  • Press down to sink the greens as much as you can into the liquid broth.
  • Close the Instant Pot lid (make sure the valve is up – in the position for sealing) and pressure cook on high for 15 minutes.
    Close the Instant Pot lid (make sure the valve is up – in the position for sealing) and pressure cook on high for 15 minutes.
  • When the cooking time is finished, allow a natural pressure release for at least 15 minutes.
  • To open the Instant Pot lid, move the valve to ‘venting’ and manually release any remaining pressure, if applicable.
  • Serve Black folks’ soul food collard greens right away and enjoy!
    Serve Black folks’ soul food collard greens right away and enjoy!

Video

Notes

Black Folks Soul Food Collard Greens Recipe Ingredients

Nutrition

Calories: 240kcal | Carbohydrates: 20g | Protein: 24g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Cholesterol: 64mg | Sodium: 1238mg | Potassium: 786mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 9g | Vitamin A: 6095IU | Vitamin C: 49mg | Calcium: 302mg | Iron: 3mg
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